AUSTIN, Texas — Texas didn't change with Donald Trump on the ballot. But the differences could be dramatic with him in the White House.

A wall stretching along the entire 2,000-mile border with Mexico. Millions of immigrants potentially closer to deportation.

The U.S. Supreme Court, restocked with Trump appointees, tilting in favor of divisive Texas laws over abortion and voting rights.

All is possible after the billionaire easily won Texas and then the presidency early Wednesday, stunning Democrat Hillary Clinton and the world.

What's next could be an agenda that carries high stakes for Texas' sizeable immigrant population and relationship with Mexico, and a Trump administration where Texas Republicans old and new could find powerful jobs.

Trump didn't clinch as dominant a Texas victory as past Republican nominees: His lead was nine points as Texas shattered turnout records with more than 8.2 million voters. Although still a landslide for Trump, his victory stands as the state's closest presidential race in 20 years.