AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — With Republicans controlling two-thirds of state legislatures, as well as the White House and Congress, expectations among conservatives are soaring that the time for a "school choice" revolution has finally arrived.

They want vouchers to become available widely, and the idea is advancing. Nationally, 27 states now permit public money to flow to private schools.

Supporters say letting youngsters spend education funds where they want will make schools more competitive and efficient, and give families more freedom.

But Texas is resisting, not only dragging its feet but actively combatting the movement. The state House has defeated voucher plans each of Texas' last three sessions, and the chamber has helped derail 50-plus such proposals since the 1990s.

That's unusual for the country's largest red state, which often champions leading conservative causes.